Empowering students and teachers in Sri Lanka

TCU alumna Chrishnika Galbadage, an Early Childhood Education major, now supervises  20 teachers and nearly 200 students at an international school in Sri Lanka.

TCU alumna Chrishnika Galbadage, an Early Childhood Education major, now supervises 20 teachers and nearly 200 students at an international school in Sri Lanka.


A love of math and need for a creative outlet led Chrishnika Galbadage to major in Early Childhood Education at TCU. Now, she serves as a supervisor for 20 teachers and nearly 200 students at an international school in Sri Lanka.

“I started school as an engineering major but needed a more creative outlet,” explained Galbadage. “Studying education gave me the opportunity to be creative and learn how to teach what I love – math.”

Galbadage graduated in 2010 with degree in Early Childhood Education and an endorsement in English as a Second Language. In 2011, she earned a master’s in Elementary Education through the Accelerated Master’s Option in the TCU College of Education.

After working in College Station, Texas after graduation, Galbadage moved back to her hometown in Sri Lanka to begin working as a 5th grade teacher at Horizon College International. One year later, she was promoted to lead the 3rd-6th grade teachers.

“I make sure that our educators are teaching effectively and in a way that children will understand,” said Galbadage. In addition to her responsibilities as a teacher supervisor, she also teaches math and Christianity.

While at TCU, Galbadage said her favorite courses focused on teaching methods for math and science. “The classes were very informative and we learned to conduct lessons in ways that would benefit students through inquiry-based learning.”

Inquiry-based learning is a project-oriented pedagogic strategy that engages students in active learning through formulating questions and finding resolutions to questions and issues. Galbadage said she tries to incorporate as many inquiry-based lessons as possible into her teaching and encourages other teachers to use the same strategy.

“Don’t be afraid to implement new learning strategies in your classroom,” said Galbadage. “Even if those methods may seem foreign to other teachers, be confident in what you have learned and the children will benefit.”